CB ideas

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Dave Ireland

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#1
Idly kicking around the idea of fitting a CB radio into the Windjammer.
I like @Scott-E 's solution of having it by the side and detachable for stowage.
@Scott-E Does the CB on yours come out through your amplied speakers, and is it loud enough to hear easily at highway speed? What about mike use, is it a encumbrance to use by hand when riding?

If you're happy enough with that setup, I will probably give it a try. I'd thought of wiring in small helmet speakers and mike, but the faff of continually having to plug-in and unplug every time (and for sure, forget to do it sometimes) puts me off that idea.
Space seems to be a bit of a problem. I don't have a Cycle Sound, and I'd be reluctant to leave a decent CB set exposed to passing scrotes, which is why I was taken with the idea of securing it when parked.

I have a couple of old-school CBs, but they're big and bulky, and would be a bear to fit in the front anywhere. I'd thought of mounting one in a pannier, but remote control is a problem, and changing channels or simply adjusting the clarifier would entail stopping, getting off and fiddling. Not the best choice, I think.

In spite of many CBs having been fitted to bikes in the heyday of the hobby, I can't find many pics of how they were done - some people must have addressed some of the issues, somewhere.
 
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Scott-E

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#2
Idly kicking around the idea of fitting a CB radio into the Windjammer.
I like @Scott-E 's solution of having it by the side and detachable for stowage.
@Scott-E Does the CB on yours come out through your amplied speakers, and is it loud enough to hear easily at highway speed? What about mike use, is it a encumbrance to use by hand when riding?

If you're happy enough with that setup, I will probably give it a try. I'd thought of wiring in small helmet speakers and mike, but the faff of continually having to plug-in and unplug every time (and for sure, forget to do it sometimes) puts me off that idea.
Space seems to be a bit of a problem. I don't have a Cycle Sound, and I'd be reluctant to leave a decent CB set exposed to passing scrotes, which is why I was taken with the idea of securing it when parked.

I have a couple of old-school CBs, but they're big and bulky, and would be a bear to fit in the front anywhere. I'd thought of mounting one in a pannier, but remote control is a problem, and changing channels or simply adjusting the clarifier would entail stopping, getting off and fiddling. Not the best choice, I think.

In spite of many CBs having been fitted to bikes in the heyday of the hobby, I can't find many pics of how they were done - some people must have addressed some of the issues, somewhere.
My CB is mounted so the in-radio speaker is pointed so it's unobstructed and pointed toward the inside of the fairing. It's loud enough to hear as I have factory installed exhaust so the bike engine is super quiet. As for as using the stock microphone, that's no problem as long as you are not using the clutch. About 90% of the time you will be using the CB while cruising along without the need to use the clutch. The other 10% of the time I can usually time it so I can use the Mic between stops, starts, and shifting. The thing to remember is CB Radio is not used very much by anyone at this time. Most Truckers no longer have CB's in their Tractor-Trailer rigs because Cell Phones and the Internet have replaced them. The only time I use mine is when I ride with some guys with older Goldwings and Harley's with CB Radios that came factory installed. Modern Touring Bikes no loner have CB Radios and they are no longer offered as an option. To be honest I use the Public Address feature on my CB Radio along with a small Public Address speaker that's very loud more than actually using it to talk to other people with CB Radios. It's as loud as my horn and much more effective when dealing with dumb Cagers. Anyway, I could make a helmet mounted microphone and a Push to Talk switch on the handlebar but considering how little I use it just using the hand mic is good enough and it's easy and cheap. If you are planning to communicate with other Bikers in group rides for anything other than letting guys on older Goldwing's and Harley's with factory installed CB Radios have a chance to use them a better option would be a helmet mounted BlueTooth unit made for that purpose. They are totally wireless and easy to mount to your helmet. They have built-in rechargeable batteries so there are no wires of any kind extending from your helmet that must be plugged into the bike. They also connect to your Cell Phone so you can make and take calls safely.
 
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Dave Ireland

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#3
Thanks for the info, Scott, much appreciated.
Good idea on the Bluetooth headset - the prices must have come down by now. I was aware of them a few years ago, but all I could find were some pretty expensive ones, and those were aimed at well-heeled touring riders for cellphone use.
I'm kind of taken with the idea of using one of my older '80s sets and treating it as a period accessory, but a working one. Most of the time it wouldn't actually be used, but there is a regular CB group around here and getting out to them from the bike kind of appeals. There is also a slight resurgence of interest in CB in general in the country, so who knows, it might have wider use when I ever go further afield (not much these days, anyway).
I have a modern set that would easily fit, but it's still too valuable to risk losing or damage. If I can lay hands on something slightly older but small I don't mind risking a few bucks on something that might get wrecked or stolen.
It's handy to know that the speaker volume and handset are an adequate setup, though.
 
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GreggS

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#4
Well, I ride with friends with CB’s and they have new bikes. Can Am & HD! But they have factory CB setups that are wired to the helmets. The Can Am doesn’t have an option yet for BT, but I think HD does. I elected to go Bluetooth and it works great. What I did is get a device - SR10 from Sena with push to talk button on the left grip, and it can hook to the CB and two other devices such as an iPad or gps. In fits into the left small pocket and the battery last more than I can ride. The radio I bought was a Midland 75-822 portable. Mounted on the bars with a Ram mount that took some minor modification and with the included Midland remote case that brings together the bike mounted antenna and power with a quick disconnect that makes the radio a rapid off and on. It takes longer to take my helmet off then it does to remove the radio. All of this works with via BT to a Sena helmet setup. Of course, the SR10 is compatible with any BT brand. They have many styles of these and I’ve used them on a half helmet and a modular. Between the headset and the SR10, you can setup the priorities between all your devices. My phone is number 1, followed by the CB and FM Radio. Of course, you can BT with your rider and other bikes. Most people that I have talked to on the phone in my pocket are surprised that I’m on my bike. The headset can control the CB volume and generally, I don’t have to fuss with with the squelch once I’ve got it set.
I still have my Vetter Sound, but I removed it. Both of the radios I had were just not capable of standing up to the environment of a bike. Grabbing the mike to talk also was a pain. I believe a handheld is going to be more rugged. I started this project with a Cobra handheld, but the Midland unit is considerably smaller by not using the battery case and switching it for the antenna/power module that sits in the left pocket on the WJ. I’m using a fire stick short antenna designed for no ground plane. My realistic range is about 5 miles max.
 
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